Tamaki Maori Village

Unique Maori experience

 

  • New Zealand’s most awarded cultural performance

Kia Ora, experience an evening of ceremonial ritual, powerful cultural performance, story-telling & hangi feasting. Share in the Powhiri, our ancient ceremony of welcome before entering our pre-European Maori village nestled within a native Tawa forest. The village comes alive with sights, sounds & activity of days gone by including haka, poi, tattooing, weaving, carving and arts of warrior training. You will have the opportunity to participate in these activities. Witness the earth being scraped away from the hangi pit to reveal baskets of food cooked beneath the ground on hot stones. Enter our ancestral meeting house and enjoy a powerful cultural performance before dining on our traditional hangi buffet feast!

The Maori Koru design you see on our website is very spiritual and is inspired by the New Zealand native fern fond unfurling as it grows. It represents peace, tranquility, personal growth, positive change and awakening. It is also associated with new life and harmony, or, anyone starting a new phase of their life.

 

Please note we can also arrange unique tours to include an overnight stay in a Maori meeting house called a Marae.

Learn all about this fascinating culture only found in Aotearoa New Zealand.

  • Private, special welcoming
  • Continental breakfast included
  • Private outdoor spa and bar facilities
  • Freshly made afternoon tea on arrival
  • Maori village and full cultural evening experience
  • Entertainment and hosting within a native Tawa forest
  • Storytelling with Maori guides around a blazing fire pit
  • A once in a lifetime opportunity to stay within a traditional Maori village
  • Exclusive interactive and educational afternoon programme with Maori guides
  • One nights accommodation in a traditional carved sleeping house with all linen and towels provided

 

Early bookings essential

Please contact us for further information

 

Māori world view

Kaitiakitanga means guardianship, protection, preservation or sheltering. It is a way of managing the environment, based on the traditional Māori world view.

Traditionally, Māori believe there is a deep kinship between humans and the natural world. All life is connected. People are not superior to the natural order; they are part of it. Like some other indigenous cultures, Māori see humans as part of the web or fabric of life. To understand the world, one must understand the relationships between different parts of the web.

Kaitiakitanga is a vehicle for rediscovering and applying these ideas.